It can be frustrating and frightening if your immigration options are limited.

 

But there's hope: the law is ever-changing. More programs are becoming available, and one day, one could fit you. 

In the meantime, scroll down for guidance on living a safer undocumented life. 

5 Pieces of Advice

For People Without Papers

GOOD MORAL CHARACTER

Volunteer.

Go to church.

Work hard in your job.

Support your family.

Pay taxes and bills on time.

If you become eligible for an immigration benefit, you'll be more likely to win your case if you can show that you're a person of good moral character. 

SAVE MONEY

When immigration benefits do become available to you, it will help to have some money set aside to put toward the application fees. And if you ever were put in removal proceedings, it would be important to have money with which to post bond and be released from custody. 

AVOID ARRESTS

Having a criminal record can make it hard for you to get immigration benefits in the future. Certain types of criminal offenses could also cause you to be placed in removal proceedings. If you are arrested, cooperate with police and do everything you can to right the wrong, including paying all fines.

GET AN

ATTORNEY'S CARD

Know what your options are. Apply for any immigration benefits available to you. Find an attorney you trust and keep his or her card in your wallet or purse. If you are taken into the custody of immigration police, call your attorney so he or she can advocate for you.

WATCH THE NEWS

Immigration law changes all the time. Be aware of which political candidates support programs that could benefit you and follow the news to find out if and when those programs are implemented. Follow us on social media. We post updates relevant to our clients.

Know Your Rights

The most common way undocumented people come in contact with immigration police is through driving offenses. Avoid driving without a license, follow all law and regulations if you do drive, and watch this video to find out how to behave if you're stopped.

(Note: At this time, this video is only available in Spanish.)

"If you don't speak English, it's wise to carry a card with you that says (in English)

that you would like the opportunity to call an interpreter."

-- John Broyles, Attorney

Learn More

The American Civil Liberties Union is an organization that helps minority groups know and defend their rights. Visit their immigrant's rights page to find out more.